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Desert Island Thursday • The Eels

No Comments Alternative Blues Desert Island Thursday rock

Anarchy suits us just fine.

Hello there, and Happy Thursday to you all out there in kilScenedom. Instead of gearing this piece up how I normally do with small chit chat before the main content is discussed, let’s just get right into it, shall we? We’ve never done something like this before. Our Desert Island Thursday features have always been so pure. The formula is simple: Pick an album that you want to be trapped on a deserted island with for the rest of your existence (or at least until the Professor can figure out a way to repair le S.S Minnow.) Not once since we started this feature have we ever done a greatest hits type of deal. I’ve always considered greatest hits packages to be cheating, but then I slapped myself really hard in the face and realized that this is not Rolling Stone and Jann Wenner is not my god. This is kilScene.com, dammit! Why live by a structure of rules? Anarchy suits us just fine. We’re doing a greatest hits record and 2008’s Meet the Eels: Essential Eels, Volume 1: 1996-2006 is the winner.

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we were all to blind with the brand new medium of “reality television” to notice the signs of its impending dominance.

The Eels first came on my radar in 1996 with the release of the single, “Novocaine for the Soul”, off of their album, Beautiful Freak. 1996 was also the last time that the Eels were really ever important to the media. This is the media we’re talking about. If you remember what happened a little bit after, MTV’s Real World and Road Rules became more important to the station than music had (yes, yes, they still played music after 1996.) The point I’m trying to make is that the beginning of the end was just around the corner, and we were all too blind with the brand new medium of “reality television” to notice the signs of its impending dominance.

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… for as much as I love Beck, he does have an air of douchbaggery about him.

I’m sitting here at the ol’ laptop rediscovering the Eels’ music and I had forgotten how many great pop songs that Mr. E and company have given us over the years. Mark Oliver Everett (“E”) is, and has always been (probably will always be) the only consistent member of the Eels; and, his genius for producing off the beaten path pop tunes is unparallel to any other artist of his ilk that does pretty much the same thing. Beck is like Mr. E, but then again, for as much as I love Beck, he does have an air of douchebaggery about him.

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I have no love lost for Missy.

The Eels release consistently good records. Their sound remains as it always has; and that’s alright because, if the formula works, why would you deign to change it? Okay, now I’ve heard it all. Ladies and gents of kilScenedom, The Eels have surprised me once again in the course of my writing this piece. Why you ask? The Eels did their own version of Missy Elliot’s “Get Your Freak On”. Wow. Anyone who knows me knows that I have no love lost for Missy. I’m just not a fan, but you know what? If the Eels want to release a whole album of Missy Elliot covers, then I say do it and I’ll buy the record.

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let’s add the Eels to that list of the summertime groove machine.

With summer fast approaching, people need some good feel time summer music to groove to. Sure, we can all fall back on The Beach Boys, Sublime, and Bob Marley, but let’s add the Eels to that list of the summertime groove machine. If you’re like me and are hard pressed to pick your favorite Eels album, don’t. Just pick up their greatest hits and go with that instead. You can pick up Meet the Eels: Essential Eels, Volume 1: 1996-2006 right here. Summer’s come early and you’re welcome! Want more from the Eels? What? Of Course you do. Please visit them here:

The Eels Official Website

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