Home

From the blog

Desert Island Thursday • Oingo Boingo A-Go Go

No Comments Desert Island Thursday New Wave

Well hello there my fellow kilSters! As luck would have it, I’m stranded on a deserted island (No, not really…), and as it turns out, the only things on this blasted island is an endless supply of coconuts, batteries, and an iPod dock (Thank goodness my iPod survived the shipwreck, right?). For this week’s Desert Island Thursday, we’ll be taking a look at and listening to Oingo Boingo’s 4th album, 1985’s Dead Man’s Party. Wow, I’m sure that there are people reading this right now who A) Have never heard of Oingo Boingo and B) Were born after 1985. If that happens to be the case, no worries, these are the people I’m writing this for.

Wow, I’m sure that there are people reading this right now who A) Have never heard of Oingo Boingo and B) Born after 1985. If that happens to be the case, no worries, these are the people I’m writing this for.

People like to play it cool and assume that there’s not one album that is essential to their lives, and I say nay! Oingo Boingo was what was great about New Wave in the 1980’s. Sure, maybe to some, Danny Elfman (That’s right. THAT Danny Elfman) & Co. were a carbon copy of Devo, but I won’t speak on that claim because, quite frankly, I am not all that familiar with Devo’s music apart from “Whip It“, and the fact that Mark Mothersbaugh, leader of Devo, essentially has gone on the same career path as Danny Elfman, scoring movies, television shows and the like. Well, Mark has composing since 1982, so I don’t know, maybe Danny Elfman is just a big Mark Mothersbaugh fan, but I digress…

Regardless of the comparisons between the two groups and the lives led by their respective lead singers, that matters not. The fact remains that Oingo Boingo’s Dead Man’s Party is a fantastic fucking album. Every time I listen to the album (like I’m currently doing), for those forty-one minutes, I revert back to the Halloween spirit (complete with synthesizer accompaniment!)

Every time I listen to the album…for those forty-one minutes, I revert back to the Halloween spirit (complete with synthesizer accompaniment!)

The 1980’s produced some of the greatest moments in pop music history and Oingo Boingo helped further that trend along in the process. Around the time they we’re recording the album, they also found the time to write and record the theme song to that John Hughes movie of adolescence and computer generated women, Weird Science, a song which was so good, they decided to include it to Dead Man’s Party, thus solidifying the classic status of the album (not that they knew it was going to be a classic when they we’re busy recording it in 1985, but look at how far it’s come since then…hell, I’m writing about it in 2013, aren’t I? That should tell you something).

Oingo Boingo went on for ten more years after Dead Man’s Party before finally calling it quits in 1995. I don’t know what ever happened to the rest of Oingo Boingo, especially that Danny Elfman. I sure do hope he found a way to make ends meet after the dissolution of the group. I’m sure wherever he is, regardless of his current state, that, hey, at least he was once apart of a cool band, that, although they are currently defunct, their music resonates like the spookiest of wind chimes on the last day of October. As long as we still have Oingo Boingo’s music, then have no fear. Halloween will always be a PLAY button away.

To purchase Oingo Boingo’s Dead Man’s Party, it’s as easy as clicking right here

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*